Category Archives: Uncategorized

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Filipinos in Santa Fe

Category : Uncategorized

The Filipinos in Santa Fe gathered for a get-together on April 21, 2018 hosted by Celia Wheeles.  Thanks to Celia and to all those who attended.  We hope to see you in all our Filipino events.  Lt Col Gloria Kauz, president of FAFNM and past president Dr. Dely Alcantara attended the event.


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2018 Pista sa Nayon

Pista poster

Pista sa Nayon (festival of nation) is a beauty pageant coronation night, dinner & entertainment event.  It’s the biennial project of the Filipino American Foundation of New Mexico (FAFNM) to raise funds to support activities in the Filipino community including college scholarship funds.

Sept. 22, 2018, Saturday, 6:00 pm

Inn at Rio Rancho

1465 Rio Rancho Bld.  SE, Rio Rancho, NM 87124

Tel. 505-892-1700

Ticket prices:

Tickets:  $38 per person (11 yrs old and older), $15 per child (3-10 yrs old),

Free per child (under 3 years old).

To print flyer, click:  Pista 2018 FLYER

For tickets, contact Lt Col Gloria Kauz 505-629-9474 or candidates.

To place an ad or greeting in the souvenir program, contact Pearl King at perlagking@cableone.net or Lina Rollins at linarollins@gmail.com.  Click: Ad contract 2018 Pista sa Nayon

Candidates:

  • Pearly Belen, Rio Rancho
  • Gloria Dalahay, Santa Fe
  • Krystal Limalima, Albuquerque
  • Miracle McCastle, Rio Rancho
  • Ramona Piskel, Albuquerque

(NOTE:  Click photos for bigger image.)

How can you help your candidate?

  • Buy ballots from her.  (We will have them available on May 19).
  • Advertise or Post a greeting (ex. “Congratulations to XX”)  And indicate her name. Click: Ad contract 2018 Pista sa Nayon
  • Help sell tickets (Tickets will be available at the Santacruzan, May 19, event.) and inform the person you bought the ticket from to credit it to her.

Rules for the Candidate

  • Must be a paid FAFNM member
  • Must be at least 16 years of age.  (If you are younger than 18, a parental/guardian consent is required.)
  • Must be active in fundraising activities for THIS event such as
    • selling tickets/ballots
    • soliciting ads

Compensation for Candidates

The candidate who can sell the tickets/ballots and solicit the most advertisements will win first place and receive a percentage of the total amount raised as indicated below:

  • First place (Binibining Pilipinas New Mexico 2018) = 25%
  • Second place (Binibining Luzon 2018) = 20%
  • Third place (Binibining Visayas 2018) = 15%
  • Fourth place (Binibining Mindanao 2018) = 10%
  • Fifth place (Binibining Albuquerque 2018) = 10%

Binibini means “Miss”

For inquiry, contact FAFNM president, Lt Col Gloria Kauz at 505-629-9474, kauzgloria@gmail.com.

Why we raise funds

FAFNM (former Filipino American Association of NM) has been in existence for almost five decades.  Just like any organization, our activities constantly need funding such as:  our annual Santacruzan (which was introduced in 1977), membership picnic (Independence Day celebration), Simbang Gabi (evening mass in December), and Christmas party.  We have a lot of outreach projects: for the veterans (a picnic in honor of Bataan veterans in April), youth, seniors, and Filipinos from other parts of NM.  We are one of the few ethnic organizations in NM that offers college scholarship funds to encourage our youth who are active in the community to pursue education beyond high school.  We have consular outreach that facilitates the Philippine Consulate in Los Angeles to come to Albuquerque to serve Filipinos on immigration issues such as renewal/application of passport, dual citizenship, and other immigration matters.  This outreach makes it possible for Filipinos in NM and surrounding states to save money from flying to Los Angeles.

Lina Rollins, the last  Mutya ng New Mexico (2016)

We are eternally grateful to the past and present candidates (and volunteers) for helping us raise funds for the FAFNM.  We are also grateful to the Caroling Group headed by Jimmy and Betsy Custodio for raising funds for the college scholarship every year.  Thank you very much.

PAST PISTA SA NAYON PAGEANT WINNERS:

 


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FANHS National Conference 2018

Join Filipino Americans from all over the US (34 chapters) to the 17th National Conference of the Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS) on:

July 11, Wed – 2:00 pm, Tour of Chicago and Registration

July 12 to 14, Thurs to Sat. – All Day

Hyatt Regency O’Hare, Rosemont, Illinois

To register, click on FANHS Conference Registration

To join tour on Wed July 11, click on tour.

Hosted by FANHS Midwest chapters

Pearl and Dely with Dr. Dorothy Cordova, FANHS co-founder in New York (2016).

Links:

Pearl with Kevin Nadal (her right) and FANHS members in 2016.

2012 FANHS Conference in Albuquerque with Johnny Itliong.

FANHS Chicago – host of 2018 conference: Click 2018 Conference. 

Tel. 630-969-2971 (phone taken from FB)

NOTE:  Registration Form will be posted later.

To inquire about booking a room:  Hyatt Regency O’Hare

Visit:  FANHS National

Visit our Rio Grande Chapter information and membership:  FANHS RG and membership form.

You can also email Pearl at perlagking@cableone.net.

 

 


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2018 in Review

Category : History , Uncategorized

This page chronicles events that have occurred already.  For upcoming activities, click on:  Events.

NOTE:  Click on photo for larger image.

January

Seniors Jan 28 2018

Happy Birthday to our Seniors who jointly celebrated their Jan and February birthdays on Jan. 28 hosted by Myrna Samson.  Photo shows, from left: Vicky Adaoag, Myrna, Celia Wheeles, Bonnie Rogers, Pete Noriega, Armeli Quezon, FAFNM President Gloria Kauz, and Annie Bondoc.

 

April

April 7:  Dr. Dely Alcantara received the Si Se Puede Award from Dolores Huerta at the Cesar Chavez Day on April 7 at the National Hispanic Cultural Center for her life long advocacy for social justice, veterans and children’s issues.  Photo shows Dr. Alcantara with Dolores Huerta (holding the award for her).  To view, click:  Dely’s Speech.  The Filipino Performing Arts Group (FPAG) performed including a poetry reading by Ashley Yssabelle Leonen – “A Dollar Forty an Hour” (minimum wage in the 1960’s which the Filipino farm workers fought for), a tribute to Larry Itliong, at the event.

April 14, Sat.  Picnic Honoring the Bataan Veterans, Bataan Park (photos below).  The Filipino American Foundation of New Mexico sponsored the first Picnic Brunch in honor of the Bataan Veterans.  It was attended by more than 100 people – families of Bataan Veterans, those who served or still serving in the military, and the Filipino community.  The event was organized by Lt Col. Gloria Kauz, president of FAFNM and Maj. Richard Luena (USAF, ret.), liaison to the Bataan Veterans affairs.  Thanks to all those who brought food (like letchon) and volunteers.

April 21, Sat., noon, Private Residence in Santa Fe.  The Filipinos there had a luncheon party hosted by Celia.  See photos on:  Filipinos in Santa Fe.

May 6, Sun.  Asian Festival of Cultures, Veterans Memorial Park.  The Ethan Sabay Philippine Folkloric Group performed along with other Asian performing groups.  The Federal Asian Pacific American Council members were also there.

Ethan Sabay Philippine Folkloric Group (Sayaw sa Baston)

FAPAC members at the Asian Festival 2018 with Mayor Tim Keller (back, center)

If you have any news or information you want to share, please email web administrator, puppetnettes@gmail.com.

 


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Simbang Gabi

Category : Uncategorized

You Are Cordially Invited To the

Simbang Gabi

(evening Mass Celebration)

 

Sangre de Cristo Church

8901 Candelaria Road NE

Albuquerque, NM 87112

(Between Wyoming and Moon )

CHECK DATES FOR 2018 FROM THIS PAGE IN NOVEMBER!

Evenings at 6:00 pm

PLEASE: invite your entire family, relatives, and friends to joyfully celebrate and experience one of the most and best Filipino Christmas traditions.

POTLUCK FOLLOWING THE MASS

(Fr. Joel really appreciates your presence and any traditional food for the potluck following the Mass in the Parish Hall)

Donations are appreciated.

PLEASE contact EMILIE TO VOLUNTEER TO BE A LECTOR AND TO OFFER TO HELP.

Simbang Gabi is a Filipino Christmas tradition. Simbang Gabi is also known by its popular Spanish name as the Misa de Gallo, or Mass of the rooster. Simbang Gabi is also recognized by Filipino communities who are living elsewhere in the world.  No matter how or when this celebration takes place, Simbang Gabi provides a strong indication of the depth of Catholicism among the Filipino people.

We encouraged all BODs to come out and participate on this tradition.


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Filipino Week at UNM Gallup

Category : History , Uncategorized

The Filipino American National Historical Society Rio Grande (FANHS RG) participated at the first Filipino Culture Week (April 10-13, 2017) at the University of New Mexico Gallup on April 11, 2017.   FANHS RG members were guest speakers:  Pearl King who discussed about Migration of Filipinos to the US and ultimately to NM, Tessie Greenfield talked about the Philippine – New Mexico Connection and played the kulintang with some student volunteers, Cris Underwood about his journey as an adopted child, and Al David, author of The End of the Trail, a 96-year old Bataan veteran.  Mr. David was honored by some veterans before his speech.

Thanks to Dr. Shirley Heying, Karla and Jonathan for inviting us.  Also to Agaton, a trained Filipino chef from Arizona for serving a variety of Filipino food.

Back to HOME.


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Santacruzan 2017

(To view full images, double click on the photo and click again for bigger image.)

Santacruzan (40 years of celebration)

Around 250-300 people (including 100 sagalas, performers and volunteers) attended the annual  Santacruzan on May 20, 2017 at the Old Town Plaza which started with the Holy Mass at the San Felipe de Neri Church at 4 pm and followed by the procession and Cultural Show that lasted until 8 pm. This annual free event which is sponsored by the Filipino American Foundation of New Mexico (FAFNM) was introduced by Consuelo (Chito) Zafra, see top photo, (who celebrated her 95th birthday at this event) and her late husband, Eugene Zafra in 1977.  Other FAFNM members who have made this event possible for 40 years are: Heddy Long, Cora Romillo, Myrna Samson, Betsy Custodio and members of the Filipino community.)  The welcome speaker was Dr. Dely Alcantara, president of FAFNM and the Filipino American Community Council (co-sponsor of this year’s event).  The Cultural Show (by the Ethan Sabay Philippine Folkloric Group and the Filipino Performing Arts Group) was also co-sponsored by the City of Albuquerque City Council and Cultural Services.  The event is usually scheduled on the third Saturday of May.  We hope to see you at the next Santacruzan on May 19, 2018!!! (Check our EVENTS page.)

Sagalas

Rey and Reynas with Sagalas

“Santacruzan” is the word that Filipinos use to refer to “Santa Cruz de Mayo,” a celebration in honor of our Blessed Mother.  The celebration commemorates Queen Helen’s finding the Holy Cross during the reign of her young son, King Constantino.  It is believed that “Reyna Elena,” “Rey Constantino,” and their subjects asked for the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary to help them find the Holy Cross which had been taken away from the Christians by the infidels.  The “Santa Cruz de Mayo” is celebrated by a procession commemorating this historic event.  Throughout the procession, the song “Dios de Salve” is sung.

During the month of May in the Philippines, every evening, there is a town somewhere celebrating the “Santa Cruz de Mayo.”  A town usually does it for nine consecutive evenings, like a novena.  On the ninth evening, the whole town has a fiesta.  Nine consecutive evenings are not practical here in Albuquerque. So, on Saturday, May 20th, we will celebrate the 9th evening.

“Santa Cruz de Mayo” is also referred to as “Flores de Mayo.”  May is the month when flowers of all kinds are blooming in the Philippines, so the procession is adorned with colorful gay flowers.  For this reason, one of the queens in the procession is called, “Reyna de las Flores.”

Angels at the procession

The participants in the procession are called “sagalas.”  They represent the important individuals during the expedition and the angels and saints that were called upon to intercede for them.  The main characters in the procession are:  Reyna Elena, Reyna de las Flores, Reyna Sheba, and Reyna Esther.

Back to HOME.


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Ethan Sabay Philippine Folkloric Group (ESPFG)

 

ESPFG at Santacruzan 2017

 

Members of ESPFG 2017

To view, double click on the photos or brochure.

 

 

 

 

ESPFG Subli

ESPFG Baston

Back to HOME.

 

 


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Filipino Performing Arts Group


FPAG

The Filipino Performing Arts Group (FPAG) aims to share Philippine or Filipino American history, language and/or culture through performing arts specifically music and dances.  It also focuses on the importance of appreciating and understanding multicultures in New Mexico.  In 2018, we currently have 14 members (middle school to college students and some older adults).  Others, mostly the male dancers have taken a break after May 2017 due to demands from work and school. Some of our young (elementary) school children have also taken a break since 2017.  Practices are held on Saturdays and most of performances are also on Saturdays.

NOTE:  To view full images, double click on the photo and click again for large image.  (Photos at Santacruzan 2017 – courtesy of Kathy B. and Norma D., Cesar Chavez Day 2018 courtesy of Edna and Emilie.)

 

In addition, we are Filipino Americans living in the US, a nation of immigrants.  As such, it is important for the next generations to know their identity from both cultures, American and Filipino. If we don’t share our Filipino culture and heritage to our children, especially those who were born here, they will slowly fade away and be forgotten.

FPAG was established in February 2017 as an independent group.  Majority of the members have been performing with the Filipino American Foundation of New Mexico Cultural Dance Group for more than five years.  (The FAFNM Cultural Group was dissolved in February 2017 to give autonomy to different groups.)

2017 Pamana awardees, Manoa Youth, graduates

Pamana Awards/Filipino American History Month:  Congratulations to our 2017 Manoa Youth:  Awardee:  Miracle; Honorable Mentions: Angelo, Mary, Ashley and Franz.  Graduates: College – Zeke (cum laude); high school:  Sandy, Latrell, & John.  See press release: Alb Journal Manoa Youth 2017  Left photo shows awardees, Manoa Youth, & graduates. The two rows of photos below were taken at the event on Oct. 21 at the Wyndham Hotel. Check:  Pamana 2017.  (We congratulate Lyle Leonen who graduated in Dec. 2017 at UNM, Physical Therapy.  High school graduates in May 2018:  Angelo, Ashley, and Mary.)

 

To view full images, double click on the photos (and double click again for enlarged images).  (Photos courtesy of Maricar.)

Kulintang Music

Kulintang musicians (from left): Miracle, Malaya, Jasmine & Justine with instructor, Tessie.

Kulintang, an indigenous (percussion) instrument from Southern Philippines, is the main instrument in a kulintang ensemble.  It is composed of 8 gongs in graduated sizes.  The other instruments are:  agong, dabakan (drum), and babandil (see second photo below). (We also use the bamboos and will be using the gandingan, 4-gong set, in the future.)  Special thanks to a) Dr. Dely Alcantara and Dr. Ted Jojola who got the grant in 2004 to bring kulintang to New Mexico Filipinos (by inviting the late Danongan Kalanduyan to give a workshop);   b) New Mexico Arts Apprenticeship Program for training Miracle (2014-2015), c) Filipino American Foundation of New Mexico Cultural Dance Group coordinator in 2016, Maricar Castro, for purchasing a kulintang set that the FPAG is using now (although majority of students have their own sets), d) Filipino American Community Council (and City of Albuquerque City Council) for the grant that extended instructions to our three youth, Malaya, Jasmine & Justine (2016-2017).

To view Kulintang musicians’ performances (2016-2017), click on  FPAG Kulintang

2015:  Kulintang Recital (for New Mexico Arts), the first and only recital

 

Mindanao including Sulu Archipelago

Southern Philippine (Mindanao) Dances

  • Singkil
  • Janggay
  • Kini Kini
  • Maiden Dance (part of Singkil but also performed separately)
  • Sagayan

Ethnic or Martial Arts Dances

  • Ati Atihan
  • Sayaw Arnis

To view dances performed 2016 to 2017, click:  FPAG dances.

Contemporary Dances/Poetry (to honor contemporary Filipino musicians or heroes)

  • Pinoy Samba dance – Samba Song (by Bong Penera)
  • Hip Hop dance – Pinoy Ako (Orange and Lemons)
  • Rhythmic Poetry Reading:  “A Dollar Forty an Hour”.  This is the minimum wage during the 1960s that the Filipino farmworkers fought for.  The poem, written by Tessie, is a tribute to Larry Itliong, Filipino Farm Worker who spearheaded the Great Delano Grape Strike from 1965 to 1970 with Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta.  The teenagers or young adults usually read the poem.  Ashley read it at Cesar Chavez Day; Jasmine and Krystal at the Santacruzan.

Folk Dance:

Starting in May 2018, we are adding Tinikling which is known as the bamboo dance and the National Folk Dance in the Philippines.  This is choreographed by Krystal.  We decided to add this to our repertoire since the audience is always asking for this dance.

 

Singkil

Filipino Performing Arts Group (April 2018)

Singkil princess, Miracle.  The alternate princess is Mary.

Singkil is a dance named after an anklet worn by a Maranao princess of the Southern Philippines.  It recounts the story of Princess Gandingan who was caught in the forest during an earthquake caused by the fairies.  The crisscrossed bamboos represent the fallen trees she gracefully avoids as her loyal maiden shields her with an umbrella. The fans represent the ferocious winds. The princess will be danced by Miracle or Mary with live kulintang music played by Malaya.  (See Maiden Dance below.)  NOTE:  For those asking about the bamboos, please read at the bottom about dimension, care and where to get bamboos.

Janggay

Kulintang Music:  Pangalay Ha Janggay (Composed by Tessie), Origin of dance: Sulu Archipelago

At Cesar Chavez Day 2017. From left: Justine, Gloria, Miracle, Krystal, Mary, Jasmine Q and Sandy.

Janggay dancers at FAFNM Xmas 2016

Janggay (also called Igal Janggay or Pangalay) is a set of extended metal fingernails worn by female dancers from the Sama-Badjao tribe and Tausug people in the Sulu Archipelago. To showcase the long nails’ beauty, the hand movements include flicking, flipping and cupping of fingers. The janggay also represents the claws of the Sarimanok, a mythical bird and the headdresses represent its expanded wings.  Sarimanok, from the words sari (cloth) and manok (chicken) is a reincarnation of a goddess that loved a mortal man.

About the People:  The Sama-Badjao or just Badjao (man of the seas) is a tribe also known as sea gypsies because they live in small houseboats called vintas and they seldom stay in one place.  They are usually fishermen and sea divers.  They inhabit the shores in Sulu Archipelago in Southern Philippines.  Some dance movements mimic the rolling waves as oceans play an

Ashley

essential part in the lives of sea fearing people.   Tausug (people of the current) which stands for tau (people) and sug (sea current) is the numerically dominant group of Sulu Archipelago.  The Tausug people who are land-based are mostly sailors, pearl divers and traders.  Jolo Island strategically located near the heart of the archipelago constitutes the cultural and political center of Tausug society.

Kini Kini

Kulintang Music:  Kanditagaonan, Origin of dance:  Maranao province (LANAO)

Kini Kini dancers 2017

Kini Kini from the word kini (the royal walk) shows the elite upbringing of the Maranao women in Mindanao.  Using decorative umbrellas and scarves (two items in a hot weather), they walk gracefully to a wedding.  This version of the dance is a combination of Kini Kini (scarf) and Kinakulangan (umbrella), without the male attendants.  The music is called Kanditagaonan which means I cannot go to a wedding because I have no malong (a tube skirt).

Maranao means the “people of the lake” referring to Lake Lanao (principal town is Marawi City) in the province of Lanao del Sur and has its own language. The other Maranao provinces are:  Basilan, Maguindanao, Sulu and Tawi Tawi and cities of Marawi and Lamitan (see map).

Maiden Dance from Singkil

Kulintang Music:  Kasayaw sa Singkil, Origin of dance: Maranao province (Lanao)

Maiden Dancers at Cesar Chavez 2017

The Maiden Dance is performed by the maidens that accompany the princess in the dance called Singkil, name of the anklet worn by a princess.  This version does not include the princess.  Singkil originated from the Maranao people.  It recounts a 14th century epic, Darangen, about a princess caught in the forest during an earthquake caused by the fairies of the forest.  The fans represent the ferocious winds during a scene in the epic.  (Please see Singkil in the earlier part of this article.)

Sagayan (Male dance)

Music:  a medley of two kulintang pieces: Tagonggo and Adongkodongkogakit, Origin of dance:  Maranao and Maguindanao

Sagayan dancers from left: John, Angelo, Franz, Marc, Zeke, Latrell & Sean (2016)

Sagayan is a warrior/healing dance that is performed by both Maranao and Maguindanao male dancers.  It depicts the steps of their war hero, Prince Bantugan.  The kasity (headdress), kampilan (sword), klong (shield) and the three-layered skirts are inspired from the hero’s attire.  The male dancers are projected as fierce warriors ready to defend their master as they dance and pray before going to war.  Another version of Sagayan is a healing dance, showing trance-like movements believed to banish the evil spirits (or negative energy) while welcoming good fortune or omens.  (Assistant choreographers: Angelo and Zeke.)

 

Instrumental Piece (No Dance):

The late Danongan Kalanduyan came to Albuquerque to introduce kulintang music in 2004.

Sinulog A Kamamatuan (Sinulog old style), Version 1. Sinulog is from the Maranao word sulug or people of Sulu. (NOTE: Sinulog as in Sinulog Festival in Cebu means sulug or current in Visayan language.)  A Kamamatuan means older, traditional style derived from the word “matua” meaning old.  The musical notation of Version 1 was from the late Danongan Kalanduyan, kulintang master from Cotabato who lived in San Francisco, CA.  He came to Albuquerque in 2004 to teach kulintang through a grant obtained by Dr. Dely Alcantara for the Filipino community.  This piece is a tribute to him for his contribution in bringing this indigenous music to the Filipinos in New Mexico. The kulintang musicians who has been trained on this music is Malaya.

 

Dances from Visayan Island

Visayan map

Ati-Atihan (Male dance)

Origin: Kalibo, Aklan in the island of Panay

Ati Atihan means pretending to be Ati, one of the first people that inhabited the Philippines.  Long before Spaniards came to the Philippines in the 17th century, light skinned immigrants from Borneo and Indonesia arrived in the island of Panay.  The dark-skinned inhabitants of Panay called the Ati, lived in the upland part of the mountains where they planted rice.  The Atis sold to the immigrants small pieces of land and allowed them to settle down in the lowlands.  One day, heavy rains ruined the Atis’s crops.  They starved.  They came down to the lowlands and were fed by the people.  As a gesture of gratitude, the Atis danced for joy in the streets.

 

As a gesture of unity, the lowland people covered their faces with soot or wore black masks to look like the Atis and celebrated with them in the streets. When the Spaniards settled in the Philippines, the Ati Atihan festival, which is also a celebration of rice and unity, became part of the celebration honoring Santo Nino (Little Jesus).  After several centuries, the festival is still celebrated in Aklan every January. (Choreographer: Tessie; Assistant choreographers: Angelo and Zeke.)

Arnis: Lester, Lyle, Franz, Zeke, Angelo & John

Sayaw Arnis (Arnis Dance) (Male dance)

Music:  Over 7000 Planets (Ron Quesada, Kulintronica based in San Francisco), Origin of Arnis:  Cebu

Arnis, also called Eskrima (fencing) or Kali (KA from the Visayan words KAmot or hand and LI from the word LIhog or motion) is the national sport and Martial Arts of the Philippines. It is a stick (made of rattan), knife or sword fighting art.  It includes hand-to-hand combat, joint locks, grappling and weapon disarming techniques.

Arnis at Cesar Chavez

The dance movements focus on rhythmic calisthenics of basic strikes and blocks for beginners using one stick.

Ron Quesada, kulintang musician, from Kulintronica composed “Over 7000 Planets”, the music used in the Arnis dance.

Arnis, (from “arnes,” an old Spanish word for armor) was founded by the Indonesian inhabitants of the Srivijayan Empire that ruled most of Southeast Asia in the 13th century.  They were overthrown by the Majapahit Empire from Eastern Java, Indonesia.  Forced to flee, the Srivi refugees settled in Cebu, central part of Visayas, where they introduced Arnis.  During the Spanish colonization that lasted more than three centuries, the practice of Arnis was forbidden but practitioners trained underground with sticks and bolos.  When the Americans colonized the Philippines, the practice was allowed openly and Arnis flourished. Arnis, which has big tournaments all over the Philippines, is also offered as a PE class in some universities.  (Choreographer:  Tessie, Assistant choreographers: Angelo and Zeke.)

Pinoy Samba

This is our first contemporary dance that showcases the Filipino Jazz musician, Bong Penera who composed the song A Samba Song (1974).  We are starting to feature not just our past cultures (Southern Philippine, ethnic, martial arts dances) but also present Filipino cultures to attract young audience to our events.  This is our first piece of contemporary music.

Pinoy Ako

This is a hip hop dance from a popular song by the Orange and Lemons which talks about pride in being Filipino.  This is a second piece showcasing contemporary Filipino musicians.

Other Information:

BAMBOOS

Since we have been asked about bamboos used for dancing for Singkil and Tinikling, we are giving this information. The ideal dimension for a bamboo pole used for dances is: 1 1/2″ to 1 3/4″ in diameter and 8 feet long, however 8 feet long causes shipping to cost more than $100 so we opted to have it cut 2 inches shorter (so the length is 7’10”).  We usually use 4 bamboo poles for Singkil.  We always have one extra pole for backup. The total cost of 5 bamboos ($8.50 per pole x 5 = 42.50 ) and shipping ($30.43) is $73.93 (price in 2018).  Be sure to tell them to make sure there are NO CRACKS (or minimum cracks) and tell them they are for dancing (not for a fence).  The shipping period might cause them to crack a little.  You can order at  Frank’s Cane and Rush Supply, 7252 Heil Ave, Huntington Beach, CA 92647, Tel. 714-847-0707. Web:  www.franksupply.com.

You can also order bamboos from Home Depot (online but can pick up locally) but the diameter available is 2″ (same length: 8′).  The bigger the diameter, the heavier the bamboo.  Also, always point out that you are using them for dancing not for fence. They should have no crack, if possible.

CARE FOR BAMBOOS.  The bamboos will easily crack in a dry climate like New Mexico. Cracked bamboos can’t be used for dancing because they are harder to click and might totally crack during performance plus it may cause blister on the clickers’s hands.  Do not expose them in the sun as much as possible (only when you are performing). Do not even store in the garage where it is hot so store them inside the house.  It needs constant moisture to avoid cracking so spraying it with water maybe every week is recommended especially during summer time.  Some people leave them in the bathroom where moisture is there every time someone takes a shower.  Also, put two wood under for the bottom bamboos to protect the clickers’s hands and to protect the carpet or floor.  (NOTE:  Some venues especially residences DO NOT want their floors damaged with bamboos.)

 Children’s Group

Children lined up with salakot

Paru Parung Bukid: Joshua, Jordyn, Kai, & Mia.

Our small children have not performed since early part of 2017 but some have been playing the kulintang.

 

Contact:  FPAG Coordinator

 

Back to HOME.

 


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Surrender of Bataan 75th Anniversary

Category : History , Uncategorized

To view full images, double click on each photo and double click again for larger image.

 

The Bataan-Corregidor Memorial Foundation of New Mexico (BCMFofNM), in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque, the Filipino American Foundation of New Mexico (FAFNM) and Filipino American National Historical Society Rio Grande (FANHS RG), hosted the 2017 Bataan Memorial Ceremony on April 8, 2017 at the Bataan Memorial Park, Albuquerque.  The keynote speaker was Col. Steve Garcia.  The Gallup and Crown Point Dance Group performed Philippine dances.  The event at the Bataan Park was attended by around 300 people.

Gallup & Crown Point dancers A

Gallup and Crown Point dancers

The dinner banquet that same day which was held at the Sandia Resort & Casino, Albuquerque, was attended by 450 people.  The keynote speaker was Lt. Gen. (Ret) Edward Baca.  Guest speaker was Deputy Consul General Ambrosia Brain F. Enciso III.  Entertainment was provided by Jam Morales, Ethan Sabay Philippine Folkloric Dance Group and several bands.   The events were chaired by Maj. Richard Luena, USAF (Ret.), vice president of BCMFofNM and assisted by Nelo Edillon and Kathy Bartnick of FAFNM.  Dr. Dely Alcantara, president of both BCMFofNM and FAFNM assisted in getting grants for the event.

The events honored veterans from the New Mexico’s 200th and 515th Coast Artillery (Anti-aircraft) regiments (see below) and New Mexicans from other units.  It also honored a Bataan survivor, Al David, now an Albuquerque resident, who was with the 33rd Infantry, 31st Regiment, Philippine Division, USAF (Far East).

 


The New Mexico’s 200th and 515th Coast Artillery (Anti-aircraft) regiments fought in the defense of Luzon, Bataan and Corregidor in the opening days of World War II, and with their courage and sacrifice, for over five months, gave Our Nation time to arm and prepare a defense which would lead to ultimate victory in the Pacific.

This year, 2017, marked the 75th anniversary of the April 9, 1942 surrender of Bataan and the May 6, 1942 surrender of Corregidor, after which American and Filipino troops would fall behind a shroud of silence, enduring brutality and privation as prisoners of war.

Bataan Survivor Bill Overmier

Only 988 of the original 1,816 men of the 200th & 515th Coast Artillery men

Bataan Survivor and author Al David

would survive 3-1/2 years as prisoners of the Japanese. Today, only 11 of these men are still living.  Two of the Bataan survivors who attended the events were Mr. Bill Overmier and Al David, 96, who just published his book “End of the Trail”, a novel of the Philippines in World War II.

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